Tag Archives: audience

When “In with the New” Means Bringing Back the Old

The brass 1840s Petzval lens.

The brass 1840s Petzval lens.

The Petzval lens was developed in 1840. The brass fixture was pretty simple in design — especially compared to what’s available today — and its speed made it perfect for portrait shots. While it has been surpassed by many models after it and the digital revolution, Lomography has found a place for this oldie in today’s photo world… to the tune of over $1 million in donations to bring back the old.

So what does a lens from 1840 have to offer us now? Take one look at the results of this brass lens, and you’ll understand why some photographers still use some of the old models.

By flickr user Jonathan Wong.

By flickr user Jonathan Wong.

By flickr user Alan Butler.

By flickr user Alan Butler.

By flickr user hdll88.

By flickr user hdll88.

By flickr user micmicmor

By flickr user micmicmor

But Lomography has found a new crowdsourced way to raise awareness and funds to bring it back. The camera company recently launched a Kickstarter page to begin remaking this ancient relic for digital SLR cameras. The Kickstarter campaign currently has 11 days left and has raised $1,182,391 from 2,860 backers. Their goal was $100,000.

A New Market With this kind of a response, it begs the question — who’s pitching in? Where did this massive funding come from? Clearly Lomography has a sizable following based on their reaction from this project, but let’s think deeper. This kind of thing might catch on for other models and companies.

One of the most profitable e-deals in recent years involved the selling of a popular photo editing app, Instagram, to social media giant, Facebook. This merger solidified this trend’s potential, and Lomography’s Kickstarter campaign shows that it’s still growing strong.

An example of a typical Instagram photo with filter applied.

An example of a typical Instagram photo with filter applied.

Instagram appeals to anyone wanting to share photos, but specifically to those wanting to share photos that look like they were taken 50 years ago. The app’s photo filters allow the user to fake the look of an aged photo by accentuating colors or placing film borders around their iPhone snapshots. Why did this catch on? The same reason Lomography saw this as a viable crowdsourcing opportunity.

I’m Guilty…

It’s true. Even I have gone the way of Instagram. (The evidence: http://instagram.com/amklann) The app has been really denounced by a lot of photographers, but the tide is turning, and some are realizing that for anyone wanting to share their views, it’s worth trying.

The Future of This Trend

It’s no doubt that with the success of Lomography’s Kickstarter campaign, this trend will continue. The big picture: this shows there is major interest in old film technology being brought to digital world.

A fellow photographer on Deviantart who shoots with some old equipment suggested that the Kodak Aero Ektar lenses could be next. Not only are they cheaper than the reproduced Petzvals, but they have many of the same beautiful features.tumblr_ln5vhrgLV31qekrnyo1_500

Hey, we can dream! All of the photographers who either (like me) came about after the digital shift and were either too cheap or too lazy to pick up the old ways, or those who gave up their film equipment during the transition are no doubt excited for this opportunity.

What old equipment are you dying to use with your digital SLR?

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When the Whole World is Your Audience

If you could say something to everyone in the world, what would it be? A message of peace? A call to action? A friendly greeting?

In eras past, this was an impossibility. With the introduction of radio and television, yes, you could reach a large scale audience, but it was fleeting.

Not only does the internet allow us to tentatively talk to billions across the globe; it’s also more permanent. Perhaps this medium will not be around forever, but when you put something online, it’s visible, and it stays there. Post something on your blog, and years later, you can reread it.

So, all of you online authors, what do you say when you have an audience of the roughly 2 billion internet users? In comparison to the personal tone of handwritten letters, posting something to that many recipients seems just ridiculous, but that’s what you’re doing.

Having The Scarlet online has been a true eye opener. It’s given us so much more insight to who reads what articles and why they’re reading them. How did they get to an article about Dean Little from last year? What brought them to a history of the hipster courtesy the Clark Historical Society? And even more interestingly, in what language did they read it?

Thanks to WordPress.com’s amazing stats page, we’ve seen articles read in a few other languages, redirected from Google Translator. What a world.

Just keep that in mind, next time you’re mindlessly posting something to your blog or Google searching. All text comes from someone.