Tag Archives: fisheye

Light At the End of the Tunnel

IMG_8030

One of the old train tunnels along the trek

Earlier this week, I took a hiking trip to the Iron Goat Trail — a journey into nature that taught me more than I usually learn exploring my new home.

The Pacific Northwest is a lush area full of many different types of landscape. You’ve got the beaches, sound, rivers, towering mountains, rainforests, and even the (not so lush) desert. Iron Goat Trail sits 60 miles northeast of Seattle along Stevens Pass Highway, an already breathtaking ride.

IMG_8040

The result of using my on-camera flash in dim forest lighting

After a short walk on the start of the trail, a snowshed appeared — a towering and crumbling cement wall right along the walkway. These snowsheds protected the Great Northern Railway… at least for the most part. According to the trail’s website,

In 1910, snowslides delayed two trains at the town of Wellington. A vast section of snow on Windy Mountain broke loose and crashed down, sweeping both trains off the tracks into Tye Creek below. Rescue efforts were quickly organized, but nearly one hundred lives were lost.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

IMG_7982

Light At the End of the Tunnel

Old tunnels stretch along the trail, showing the engineering against the elements. Wooden barriers were put in place under concrete, to protect trains from the winter precipitation. All of this old architecture and beautiful mossy landscape made for amazing photos, but I had to break one of my main rules to photograph it well…

Using a Flash… For the First Time

I’ve been photographing pretty much non-stop for years. I’ve photographed landscapes, people, long exposures, macro… just about everything. One rule I abide by is never using the flash built in on my Canon Rebel xti. I’ve found that 99 percent of the time, it flattens images and leaves out the real, raw color and shadows that I love. But I found myself changing my ways!

In the heavily wooded areas with looming concrete and trees, photographing the low-lying details while not blowing out the highlights in the trees was incredibly difficult. But something clicked, and I gave in. Why not give it a try? And sure enough, with a little finesse, I was able to shed a little light on the foreground details, while still being able to capture those night natural highlights above. Lesson learned. Thanks, Iron Goat Trail!

IMG_8079

One of the snowshed walls left in the area. Used to keep massive piles of snow off the tracks.

Advertisements

Freeway – HDR

Freeway - HDR

An HDR image of Interstate 5 cutting through the north side of Seattle. Shot with my Rokinon 8mm fisheye lens.

Usually Photomatix does a fine job of giving me the HDR effect that I like — surrealistic enough to make you wonder how it’s done, but not enough to make you question the scene’s existence. This time, I blended two tonemapped versions of this photo, one of the sky and background separately, with another of the traffic to get the prefect balance I wanted.


Shooting From the Hip – Chicago

Recently my partner and I drove across the country from Massachusetts to our new home on the West Coast — Seattle. Along the way, we found ourselves in places we never thought we’d step foot in. Chicago was an amazing city that felt so cosmopolitan. It’s like a warmer, more spacious version of New York… with a much nicer coast. And the pizza… Okay, so they aren’t that similar.

But one similarity came in how I photographed this city — from the hip. Shooting candid shots of passersby is one of my favorite things, especially when you’re in an environment where people are dressing to be seen. Check out these classic and sometimes quirky views of the “Windy City.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Abandoned Philadelphia

Philadelphia is much, much more than old brick and cheese steak.

This week, I took my first trip to the Cradle of Liberty; Birthplace of America; Brotherly Love; etc. This was the last major city on the eastern seaboard I hadn’t been to, and I was pretty excited to photograph all the ordinary yet beautiful things in the city that make it a little different than D.C. and Boston, but little did I know how different my view would be.

The Philadelphia Coal Piers, according to Gjfoto, were used to refill ships’ supplies of coal. The ruins are covered in graffiti and progress in a staggered linear fashion, making for a disorienting and beautiful find, right off the highway.

A break in the labyrinth, halfway through.

A break in the labyrinth, halfway through.

Sunlight seeps in through breaks in the concrete walls.

Sunlight seeps in through breaks in the concrete walls.

Some areas are murals, plastered in detailed works of urban art.

Some areas are murals, plastered in detailed works of urban art.

The pier goes on for quite a ways, leading into new corridors and hallways.

The pier goes on for quite a ways, leading into new corridors and hallways.

Dark tunnels through the pier are covered in bright spray paint.

Dark tunnels through the pier are covered in bright spray paint.

Secondary secession: the process by which nature reclaims spaces.

Secondary secession: the process by which nature reclaims spaces.

The front of the coal pier ruins. Dirt pathways run past this place, where four-wheelers and dirt bikes speed back and forth, leaving tire marks through the trash and graffiti-covered tunnels.

The front of the coal pier ruins. Dirt pathways run past this place, where four-wheelers and dirt bikes speed back and forth, leaving tire marks through the trash and graffiti-covered tunnels.


Slideshow: Beautiful Spring Morning in Boston

Spent the early morning walking around the Back Bay. Thought I was going to do some street portraits (see them here: http://tinyurl.com/ae22ezr), but the springtime sun captured my attention more than I anticipated. Now if we could just get some leaves on the trees….

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Night Lights

Night Lights. Got some great shots tonight of the snow and silent streets. I really love what a different world it becomes when it snows, especially at night. The way the lights reflect off the snow, and the way they take in all of the colors of the night — the streetlights and passing cars.

Taken with my Rokinon 8mm, f11, ISO100. I think there’s one HDR in there, too, for good measure.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Foggy Night, Worcester, MA

I was hoping for some spooky October fog last night, and I got enough to work with. Fog in my area doesn’t usually get too thick. Worcester gets its fair share, but for some reason, it never gets very dense in my neighborhood. These shots look kind of infrared. The process began with wanting to make the taillights of a passing car more prominent. I liked the look and tweaked it a bit to get this creepy fake-infrared look. Very different for me, but I like it!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Add me on Facebook here!