Tag Archives: massachusetts

From One Apple-Crazed State to the Other

Jones Creek Farms in the Skagit Valley region of Washington state.

Jones Creek Farms in the Skagit Valley region of Washington state.

Before driving across the country, the states of Massachusetts and Washington seemed to be worlds apart. Brought forth in entirely different times, forged by various people and industries that may have some similar mindsets, but they made very different states.

The culture of west and east coast in the U.S. has historically been polarized, but after having spent a few months in my new home in the Pacific Northwest, I’m finding they might not be so different after all.

One similarity? Apples.

People in Massachusetts love fall, understandably. Fall in New England is one of the best things I’d ever experienced, especially coming from a Southern state where fall just means fewer days to wear flip-flops and sit on the porch. When my partner and I were first throwing around the idea of moving out here, the thought of going without another autumnal wave of fall themed treats, brisk mornings and crunchy leaves seemed unbearable. The Evergreen State of Washington? No brilliantly painted leaves filling the windy afternoon air?

Gourds. It's fall!

Gourds. It’s fall!

But… that’s not all true. Although WA has plenty of trees that remain the same over the seasons, we were pleased to find that there are tons that go through the fall, dropping plenty for me to step on on the walk to work in the morning.

And that horrible gray season? While it’s almost here, we’ve gotten lucky to have crisp sometimes cloudless skies, moody fog, and nice chilly weather. It’s almost like we never left.

And just when it couldn’t get any more perfect…  (you probably guessed it from the title) apples.

Who loves apples more than the people living near a ton of great Central Mass. farms? Those living in Washington. According to the Washington State Apple Commission (yeah, there is one of those — that’s how crazy it gets), Harvest of Washington apples begins in mid-August and generally ends in early November. Each year, Washington harvests over 100 million boxes of apples, each weighing about 40 pounds. That’s a lot.

More apple “core facts” — 10 – 12 billion apples are handpicked in Washington State each year. If you put all of the Washington State apples picked in a year side-by-side, they would circle the earth 29 times (wtf?!). Crazy.

Enjoy some photos of our trip to Washington’s Skagit Valley for some fall fun:

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On the Job: Warren VS Brown

As my time at GoLocalWorcester comes to a close, I’m feeling a little nostalgic about all the events and things I covered — from the intense, most expensive US Senate race in our nation’s history, to watching the area’s fiercest cyclists tackle the steepest hill in the city at the George Street annual competition — covering news and happenings in Central Mass. was a whirlwind.

I wanted to share some of these moments I had, some of which didn’t always get included in the stories I wrote. There’s only so much room for visuals.

For the first installment, I went through my photos from the US Senate race between Scott Brown (R) and Elizabeth Warren (D). The race was an ongoing spectacle filled with nasty accusations, gaffs, and tremendous funding. I followed them to office openings, meet-and-greets at local diners, speeches, and public venues and garnered some national attention for some of the pieces I wrote. It was a really fun experience, and at the end of it, I felt I had learned a great deal about political reporting and campaigns, and gained a lot of self-confidence.

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I’ll be bringing you some more slideshows in the next few days, chronicling other news events in the area and some of the lighters things I’ve covered during my time in Central MA.


Harvard University – MC Escher Style

Harvard University - MC Escher Style

Took this photo a couple years ago when a friend came to visit. We went to Boston, and I tried to include all of those quintessential moments — the Common, the historical sites, and of course walking across the Charles to Harvard.

I left this shot in black and white to emphasize the patterns. Really reminds me of some of Escher’s crazy work.


Slideshow: Beautiful Spring Morning in Boston

Spent the early morning walking around the Back Bay. Thought I was going to do some street portraits (see them here: http://tinyurl.com/ae22ezr), but the springtime sun captured my attention more than I anticipated. Now if we could just get some leaves on the trees….

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Small Wonders

This year, the city I live in won the “Golden Snow Globe” award for being the snowiest city in the nation with a population over 100,000 people. We received 108.9 inches. (If you can consider that something worthy of praise.) While I’m pretty sick of snow at this point, I had a ton of chances to capture it, big and small. Macro shots of the snow were a lot of fun, and made me think about composition a lot differently.

Things get a little more difficult, I found, when you’re dealing with such a narrow depth of field and small subject.

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Best of – Urban Decay

Urban and rural decay has been one of the most fulfilling photography experiences for me. While a lot of people look at rusted, abandoned, forgotten things and feel a sense of emptiness, for me it’s quite the opposite. These memories have so much in them, and they remind me of an area’s past.

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Having grown up in a very rural area, it amazed me when I came to New England’s second largest city to see the type of history left behind. Worcester has a rich past full of industry, immigrants, and diners — all of which have played a vital role in my capturing of it.

Hope you enjoy this collection of some of my best photos of urban decay.

 


The Aftermath – Nemo

Here are some shots of the aftermath of the blizzard that hit New England this past weekend. Before the storm, I couldn’t imagine everything covered in 2+ feet of snow, and after it hit, it looked as strange as I imagined it.

Unlike winters past, there was no snow on the ground before Nemo, and the storm completely changed the landscape, transforming everything into another world.

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